Thursday, February 26, 2015

Free book of Lenten Meditations

The letter to the Hebrews draws a strong connection
between the cross and prayer. Because every moment of our
earthly existence is threatened by death, and we know neither the
day nor the hour when that existence will come to an end, we,
too, need to cry out to the God who can save us. Like Moses, we
need the help of our fellow Christians to hold up our arms when
they grow tired. We, too, need the help of the Holy Spirit to
make up for what is lacking in our prayer. 


-The Power of the Cross 



"michael dubruiel"

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Becoming Catholic at Easter?



Michael Dubruiel
The How-To Book of the Mass is the only book that not only provides the who, what, where, when, and why of themost time-honored tradition of the Catholic Church but also the how.
In this complete guide you get:
  • step-by-step guidelines to walk you through the Mass
  • the Biblical roots of the various parts of the Mass and the very prayers themselves
  • helpful hints and insights from the Tradition of the Church
  • aids in overcoming distractions at Mass
  • ways to make every Mass a way to grow in your relationship with Jesus
If you want to learn what the Mass means to a truly Catholic life—and share this practice with others—you can’t be without The How-To Book of the Mass. Discover how to:
  • Bless yourself
  • Make the Sign of the Cross
  • Genuflect
  • Pray before Mass
  • Join in Singing the Opening Hymn
  • Be penitential
  • Listen to the Scriptures
  • Hear a Great Homily Everytime
  • Intercede for others
  • Be a Good Steward
  • Give Thanks to God
  • Give the Sign of Peace
  • Receive the Eucharist
  • Receive a Blessing
  • Evangelize Others
  • Get something Out of Every Mass You Attend
"Is this not the same movement as the Paschal meal of the risen Jesus with his disciples? Walking with them he explained the Scriptures to them; sitting with them at table 'he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them."1347, Catechism of the Catholic Church

Find more about The How to Book of the Mass here.

Monday, February 23, 2015

Free Daily Lent Meditations

Steps to Take as You Follow Christ
Ask—Do I believe in God’s providential care?
Seek—Cry out to God to save you. Realize what it means to say
that God is your Savior. Frequently call to mind all that you need
to be saved from and have recourse to God who alone can save
you.
Knock—Meditate on Romans 13:12–14. Paul uses the image of
armor that we wear, either of darkness or light. Much of what he
terms the deeds of darkness are acts that typically happen at
nightfall or in the secret of one’s heart—they are acts that take
place when we hide them from God and others. Reflect on how
putting on armor of light and bringing all of your cares before
God will change the way you see them.
Transform Your Life—Believe and trust in Jesus at all times. Do
not allow the enemy to have a foothold into your life. Make
“Hosanna, save us, Lord” the prayer that is constantly on your
lips.
Week
 
"michael dubruiel"

Friday, February 20, 2015

Friday Stations of the Cross

All about The Power of the Cross (available for free download) and the Way of the Cross (available as an app as well as in paper copies).



"michael dubruiel"

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Daily Lent Reflection

The human race has been fighting the battle against pride
since the Fall. Discontent with the lofty position God had given
them, they wanted to be just like God—but independent of
him. This disordered desire continues to be at the heart of human
nature. Only when God’s spirit lives within us to the fullest are
we able to be most fully human. And the only way to be filled
with God’s spirit is to empty ourselves of any false sense of who
we are, or who we think we have to be. This is the way of humility,
what St. Paul calls having “the mind of Christ” (1 Corinthians
2:16).
In the gospels, Jesus warns his disciples against desiring titles
and lofty honors. If we achieve greatness in life, as Cardinal del
Val did, we must guard against becoming attached to the position
or to the glory attached to it. Cardinal del Val gave the following
spiritual advice often to those who came to him for
counsel:
Have a great devotion to the Passion of Our Lord.
With peace and resignation, put up with your daily
troubles and worries. Remember that you are not a disciple
of Christ unless you partake of His sufferings and
are associated with His Passion. The help of the grace
of silence was the only thing that enabled the saints to
carry their extremely heavy crosses. We can show our
love for Him by accepting with joy the cross He sends
our way.
The cross sheds light on the way of humility; it is the path
that Christ took and the surest path for us to receive all the blessings
that Christ wishes to bestow upon us.



"michael dubruiel"

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Ash Wednesday - Lent begins


In 1991, Pope John Paul II introduced a new Bible-based interpretation of the Stations of the Cross. This devotional guide invites readers to prayerfully walk in solidarity with Jesus on his agonizing way of the cross—from his last torturous moments in the Garden of Gethsemane to his death and burial.

Now with full-color station images from previously unpublished paintings by Michael O'Brien, this booklet creates an ideal resource for individual or group devotional use, particularly during the Lenten season.

It is available in English and Spanish.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Preparing for the Cross

The procession of the cross that begins and ends each celebration
of the Eucharist should help us to redefine our lives whenever we
witness it. As the Mass begins we join all of our crosses to the
cross of Christ, asking the Lord to have mercy upon us for our
inability to see. We listen to the Scriptures to once again learn
about all the necessary events of our lives, proclaim the Church’s
belief as our own, and give thanks to God as we offer the sacri-


fice that he has provided for us. We then receive the Living God
before the cross leads us back into the world!

Having received the life of Christ in us, we are better able to

extend that love to others. I was reminded of this again a few
years ago, when I met another family who also had an unplanned
child. In the presence of the child they said what a gift they had
been given—like nothing they could have ever dreamed of asking
for, an incredible blessing. Their joy mirrored that of God the
Father, who could not contain himself in heaven when his Son
walked the earth. He opened up the heavens to exclaim, “This
is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased” (Matthew
3:17).

That same Son would experience horrible suffering at the
hands of cruel men. Assured of the love of the Father, he knew
that ultimately the Father would not let him down. When you
and I are finally convinced in the same way that God loves us,
we will welcome whatever comes our way in this life and see it
with a vision that others will marvel at. On that day we will say,
“Alleluia. Praised be God!”
"michael dubruiel"

Friday, February 13, 2015

Forgiveness and Mercy for Lent

Christians are to be forgiving and merciful; we are to live out the
unity Christ died to restore. In the early church, outsiders marveled
at the followers of Christ because of their love for one another.
Sadly, the unity that was the hallmark of the early Church
has been damaged, in some cases seemingly beyond repair. We
who are called to be “merciful” stand idly by while our brothers
and sisters in other parts of the world are offered up as scapegoats.
We who are to share the Good News huddle among our own,
contented to preach to the choir. The problem is this: Jesus died
for all, so that all might be saved. We who follow Our Lord must
live to accomplish his will.

As St. Peter points out, Jesus himself is our example. The
treatment that Jesus received on the cross was worse than most
of us can even imagine but his message of forgiveness did not
change. When Jesus rose from the dead, he did not declare a holy
war against those who had put him to death. Instead he proclaimed,
“Peace,” and sent his followers to the ends of the earth
to preach the gospel, teaching all to believe and trust in him.



"michael dubruiel"

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Free Lent Meditation Book

Available here.

The procession of the cross that begins and ends each celebration
of the Eucharist should help us to redefine our lives whenever we
witness it. As the Mass begins we join all of our crosses to the
cross of Christ, asking the Lord to have mercy upon us for our
inability to see. We listen to the Scriptures to once again learn
about all the necessary events of our lives, proclaim the Church’s
belief as our own, and give thanks to God as we offer the sacrifice that he has provided for us. We then receive the Living Godbefore the cross leads us back into the world!

Having received the life of Christ in us, we are better able toextend that love to others. I was reminded of this again a few years ago, when I met another family who also had an unplanned child. In the presence of the child they said what a gift they had
 been given—like nothing they could have ever dreamed of asking
for, an incredible blessing. Their joy mirrored that of God the
Father, who could not contain himself in heaven when his Son
walked the earth. He opened up the heavens to exclaim, “This
is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased” (Matthew
3:17).

That same Son would experience horrible suffering at the
hands of cruel men. Assured of the love of the Father, he knew
that ultimately the Father would not let him down. When you
and I are finally convinced in the same way that God loves us,
we will welcome whatever comes our way in this life and see it
with a vision that others will marvel at. On that day we will say,
“Alleluia. Praised be God!”
"michael dubruiel"

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Our Lady of Lourdes - February 11 - Pray the Rosary

Michael Dubruiel conceived and put together the small hardbound book, Praying the Rosary.  Click on the cover for more information.

"Michael Dubruiel"


The Gospels show that the gaze of Mary varied depending upon the circumstances of life. So it will be with us. Each time we pick up the holy beads to recite the Rosary, our gaze at the mystery of Christ will differ depending on where we find ourselves at that moment.

Thereafter Mary’s gaze, ever filled with adoration and wonder, would never leave him. At times it would be a questioning look, as in the episode of the finding in the Temple: “Son, why have you treated us so?” (Lk 2:48); it would always be a penetrating gaze, one capable of deeply understanding Jesus, even to the point of perceiving his hidden feelings and anticipating his decisions, as at Cana (cf. Jn 2:5). At other times it would be a look of sorrow, especially beneath the Cross, where her vision would still be that of mother giving birth, for Mary not only shared the passion and death of her Son, she also received the new son given to her in the beloved disciple (cf. Jn 19:26-27). On the morning of Easter hers would be a gaze radiant with the joy of the Resurrection, and finally, on the day of Pentecost, a gaze afire with the outpouring of the Spirit (cf. Acts 1:14) [Rosarium Virginis Mariae, no. 10].


As we pray the Rosary, then, we join with Mary in contemplating Christ. With her, we remember Christ, we proclaim Him, we learn from Him, and, most importantly, as we raise our voices in prayer and our hearts in contemplation of the holy mysteries, this “compendium of the Gospel” itself, we are conformed to Him.


Friday, February 06, 2015

RCIA Resources




Michael Dubruiel
The How-To Book of the Mass not only provides the who, what, where, when, and why of the most time-honored tradition of the Catholic Church but also the how.
In this complete guide you get:
  • step-by-step guidelines to walk you through the Mass
  • the Biblical roots of the various parts of the Mass and the very prayers themselves
  • helpful hints and insights from the Tradition of the Church
  • aids in overcoming distractions at Mass
  • ways to make every Mass a way to grow in your relationship with Jesus
If you want to learn what the Mass means to a truly Catholic life—and share this practice with others—you can’t be without The How-To Book of the Mass. Discover how to:
  • Bless yourself
  • Make the Sign of the Cross
  • Genuflect
  • Pray before Mass
  • Join in Singing the Opening Hymn
  • Be penitential
  • Listen to the Scriptures
  • Hear a Great Homily Everytime
  • Intercede for others
  • Be a Good Steward
  • Give Thanks to God
  • Give the Sign of Peace
  • Receive the Eucharist
  • Receive a Blessing
  • Evangelize Others
  • Get something Out of Every Mass You Attend
"Is this not the same movement as the Paschal meal of the risen Jesus with his disciples? Walking with them he explained the Scriptures to them; sitting with them at table 'he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them."1347, Catechism of the Catholic Church

Find more about The How to Book of the Mass here.

Thursday, February 05, 2015

Free book for Lent

A free online version of this book is available here

The procession of the cross that begins and ends each celebration
of the Eucharist should help us to redefine our lives whenever we
witness it. As the Mass begins we join all of our crosses to the
cross of Christ, asking the Lord to have mercy upon us for our
inability to see. We listen to the Scriptures to once again learn
about all the necessary events of our lives, proclaim the Church’s
belief as our own, and give thanks to God as we offer the sacrifice that he has provided for us. We then receive the Living Godbefore the cross leads us back into the world!

Having received the life of Christ in us, we are better able toextend that love to others. I was reminded of this again a few years ago, when I met another family who also had an unplanned child. In the presence of the child they said what a gift they had
 been given—like nothing they could have ever dreamed of asking
for, an incredible blessing. Their joy mirrored that of God the
Father, who could not contain himself in heaven when his Son
walked the earth. He opened up the heavens to exclaim, “This
is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased” (Matthew
3:17).

That same Son would experience horrible suffering at the
hands of cruel men. Assured of the love of the Father, he knew
that ultimately the Father would not let him down. When you
and I are finally convinced in the same way that God loves us,
we will welcome whatever comes our way in this life and see it
with a vision that others will marvel at. On that day we will say,
“Alleluia. Praised be God!”
"michael dubruiel"